Joseph Edgar Roy

Joseph Edgar Roy, G23307
Petit Rocher Nord, New Brunswick
The North Shore (New Brunswick) Regiment

Joseph Edgar Roy was born 9 September, 1922 to parents Louise and Jerome Roy, and half-siblings Josephene and Lucien Doucet. His parents had been married for 11 months before having him, Louise and Jerome being married 19 October, 1921. Roy lived in Petit Rocher, North, Gloucester County, New Brunswick. He had preferred to have been called Edgar. Roy was part of the Roman Catholic religion and could speak French and English fluently. When Edgar enlisted at age 18 in Woodstock, New Brunswick, he was recorded about 5 feet and 7 inches tall, weighing approximately 130 pounds. He had a medium complexion, blue eyes and brown hair. Edgar was identified in two ways; he had multiple scars on both buttocks and had a circular mole over the level incision of his left deltoid. Edgar was found physically fit and was put into category A. He was working as a truck driver for one year, and was hoping to return to his job if he was ever discharged from the war. He also wanted to engage in farming after the war, having one year of experience. He might have been following in his father’s footsteps since his father was a farmer. While in the war, Edgar received the 1939-45 Star, the France and Germany Star, the Defence Medal, the War Medal, and the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal and Clasp.

On 9 July, 1941, Edgar was taken on strength in Woodstock, New Brunswick. He was moved to #70 Basic Training Camp on the first of August, in 1941. In December, Edgar was absent without leave. He was gone from 1:00 a.m. on the twelfth to 11:50 a.m. on the thirteenth. For this, he was given twenty-eight days of detention, plus he forfeited two days of pay and allowances. Again, Edgar was absent without leave on 19 February, 1942. He was gone for one day and sixteen hours so he forfeited two days of pay and allowances. On the twenty-eighth of February, Roy was struck off strength in Canada on embarkation. On 1 March, he was transferred overseas to the United Kingdom. On 11 March, Roy was taken on strength to #8 Canadian Division of Infantryman Reinforcement Unit. Edgar was promoted to the rank lance corporal on 1 May. He was discharged on the seventh of July. Edgar got his first privileged leave on the seventeenth of July. Edgar was given leave with allowance from the sixteenth of October to the twenty-third of October. Edgar had received a pay raise of ten cents, going from $1.50 a day to $1.60 a day, this happening on the first of January, 1943. Roy was granted privileged leave from March 23 to April 1. On 21 April, Edgar was reverted back to a permanent grade of Private at his own request, making his rate of pay go back from $1.60 a day to $1.50 a day. He was admitted to #5 Canadian Field Dressing Station on the twenty-first of June, being discharged the same day. On 2 July, Roy was granted seven days of privileged leave. On 9 September, he was taken on strength to the North Shore Regiment. Roy was awarded the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal and Clasp. On the thirty-first of March, Edgar was given twelve days of being confined to the barracks and forfeited four days of pay for being absent without leave for three days, three hours and forty-six minutes. He was absent without leave again on the fifteenth of May for eight hours and thirty-one minutes, forfeiting one day of pay. On 6 June, 1944, Roy went missing and was struck off strength to X-6 North Shore Regiment. Later that day, Edgar was killed in action in Berniers-sur-Mer White Beach Shore. He was buried in Berniers-sur-Mer White Beach Shore cemetery but was reburied in Beny-sur-Mer Canadian Military Cemetery on 7 July, 1944.

On the twenty first of December, 1941, Edgar was admitted to Aldershot Military Hospital because he had tonsillitis. He was in the hospital for 18 days before he was recovered to his unit on the eighth of January, 1942. On June the twenty-ninth, Edgar was admitted to #3 Canadian Medical Core. He was discharged on the seventh of July. He was admitted to the #3 Canadian Medical Core on 26 August, and was discharged from #3 Canadian Medical Core on 10 September. On 18 September, Roy was admitted to the #8 General hospital, being discharged on the first of October. He was in the #8 General hospital from the twenty-first of January, 1943, to the twenty-fifth of January. He was struck off strength to #7 Canadian Infantry Reinforcement Unit on the thirty-first of January and was admitted for all purposes to #3 Canadian Infantry Reinforcement Unit  for the first and second of February. He was struck off strength to the North Shore Regiment on the eighth of April and taken on strength from #7 Canadian Infantry Reinforcement Unit. He was admitted to the #13 Canadian General Hospital on 20 August, being struck off strength to #7 Canadian Infantry Reinforcement Unit  while admitted to the hospital. On the twenty-first of August, Edgar was admitted to #13 Canadian General Hospital, attending for all purposes, pending being authorized to be taken on strength to #13 Canadian General Hospital. Edgar was discharged on the twenty-sixth of August. On 10 September, Edgar was taken on strength from #7 Canadian Infantry Reinforcement Unit. Some medical actions that happened on unknown dates include a chest X-Ray and various vaccinations.

Edgar was in the Headquarters Company which meant he was setting up headquarters wherever they would land. The North Shore Regiment was positioned in between Courseulles-de-Mer and Saint Aubin-ser-Mer. The headquarters would be in the middle of these two places so headquarters was set up in Bernières-sur-Mer. This is where Edgar was killed.

Edgar was killed in action on 6 June, 1944 after being reported missing the same day. He was killed in the field in Bernières-sur-Mer White Beach Shore, France. Edgar’s remains were buried in Bernières-sur-Mer White Beach Shore Cemetery. He was reburied in the Beny-sur-Mer Canadian Military Cemetery located in Beny-sur-Mer, France on 7 July. Edgar’s mother, Louise, was informed of Edgar’s death on the third of August, 1944. She was the one to inherit Edgar’s medals and belongings. His gravestone reads, “Cher Edgar, ta parente ne t’oublier a jamais.” Which translates to, “Dear Edgar, your parents will never forget you.”

On 1 June, 1944: The weather was clear, calm with no wind. No units were moving on that day due to that part of the battalion was marshalling in the camp.

On 2 June, 1944: The weather was clear, warm with a light southwest breeze. The section of the battalion was finishing their marshalling and everyone was generally resting.

On 3 June, 1944: The weather was clear, warm with a light westward breeze. At 9:30 a.m., the C Company moved to a specific marshalling area. The alternate battalion headquarters moved off with the C Company. At 11:45 p.m., the original battalion headquarters boarded the LCH 167 for the operation, “Overload”.

On 4 June, 1944: The weather was clear and warm in the morning, but rain came in the evening with a southeast wind. “Overload” was postponed for twenty-four hours. The troops were disembarked and paraded to a reception area that was already prepared on the docks. In the reception centre, the troops were given meals, a wash, a free issue of twenty-five cigarettes, and a reading and writing room. The Navy, Army, and Air Force Institutes was established and provided the small needs of the troops.

On 5 June, 1944: The weather was cloudy and cool with a southeast wind blowing. The craft left at 6:45 a.m. around the Isle of Wight. The trip was slow, and the regular waves brought seasickness. At 7:30 p.m., the operation was announced to be set and the ships were to land the next day.

On 6 June, 1944: The weather was cloudy and cool with a light wind from the southeast. The A and B Companies landed at 8:10 a.m. Only a few casualties came about while crossing the beach but several were killed in booby-trapped houses that were positioned along the beach. A Company reached the line of the beach-head at 9:48 a.m. At this time, there were twenty-four casualties. The B Company went on according to plan but realized that no damage from the planned air and naval bombardment had been brought to the defensives. Even though this happened, the B Company went to clear the village and let the D Company get on with their task. The D Company had advanced by 10:07 a.m. without much opposition, reaching the line of the beach-head. The B Company called for the tanks to help with the reduction of the strong point. When the AVRE’s were available, the Petards mounted them and used them to bombard the defensives. The co-operation of the infantry and tanks was described as “excellent” and gradually, the strong point was reduced.  At 11:15 a.m., one of the Atlantic walls was reduced. C Company moved along the road to Tailleville and reached the road junction near evening before being attacked. The Company made their way to the wall, realizing that the defensives were stronger than they were told. The persistent sniping was quite annoying to the attackers. The Company finally cleared the defensives and captured four officers and fifty-seven officers with their troop of tanks. In the evening, the ones of the battalion that survived recovered for the night at Tailleville.

 

Written by: Karly DeVries, a student at Smiths Falls Collegiate Institute in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada.
Rédigé par: Karly DeVries, un élève de Smiths Falls Collegiate Institute, Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada.

REMEMBER TODAY, REMEMBER ALWAYS.

THIS TRIBUTE PROFILE CONTAINS AVAILABLE BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON ONE OF THE CANADIANS WHO DIED ON JUNO BEACH ON 6 JUNE 1944. THE PROFILE ALSO RECOGNIZES THE INDIVIDUAL OR ORGANIZATION WHO GENEROUSLY SPONSORED THIS SOLDIER, AND INCLUDES A MESSAGE OF THANKS AND REMEMBRANCE FOR THEIR SACRIFICE. THIS INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE IN THE SOLDIER’S NATIVE TONGUE AND HAS BEEN COMPILED BY THE LEST WE FORGET PROGRAM AND, IN SOME CASES, THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF INDIVIDUALS CONNECTED WITH THE SOLDIERS. DUE TO THE INCONSISTENCY OF HISTORICAL RECORDS AND THE SPARSE AVAILABILITY OF FIRST-HAND WITNESSES, WE KNOW MORE ABOUT SOME THAN OTHERS. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO CONTRIBUTE ANY MATERIAL OR HELP IN OUR EFFORTS TO PRESENT THE BIOGRAPHIES IN BOTH FRENCH AND ENGLISH, PLEASE CONTACT: JBCA@JUNOBEACH.ORG.

CE PORTRAIT CONTIENT DES INFORMATIONS BIOGRAPHIQUES RELATIVES À L’UN DES CANADIENS QUI SONT MORTS SUR LA PLAGE JUNO, LE 6 JUIN 1944. IL PORTE ÉGALEMENT MENTION DE LA PERSONNE OU DE L’ORGANISATION QUI A GÉNÉREUSEMENT PARRAINÉ CE SOLDAT, AINSI QU’UN MESSAGE DE REMERCIEMENT EN SOUVENIR DE SON SACRIFICE. CES INFORMATIONS SONT DISPONIBLES DANS LA LANGUE MATERNELLE DU SOLDAT ET ONT ÉTÉ COMPILÉES PAR LE PROGRAMME LEST WE FORGET ET, DANS CERTAINS CAS, GRÂCE À LA GÉNÉROSITÉ DES PERSONNES LIÉES AUX SOLDATS. EN RAISON DE LA DISPARITÉ DES DOCUMENTS HISTORIQUES ET DES RARES TÉMOINS DE L’ÉPOQUE, NOUS NE DISPOSONS PAS DE LA MÊME QUANTITÉ D’INFORMATION SUR TOUS LES SOLDATS. SI VOUS SOUHAITEZ COMPLÉTER NOTRE DOCUMENTATION OU NOUS AIDER DANS NOS EFFORTS POUR PRÉSENTER LES BIOGRAPHIES EN FRANÇAIS ET EN ANGLAIS, MERCI DE CONTACTER : JBCA@JUNOBEACH.ORG.