Clifford Robert Drew

Corporal Clifford Robert Drew, B64119
Toronto, Ontario
The Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada

Corporal Drew is sponsored by the City of Toronto

 

Clifford Robert Drew was born on 7February 1915 in Toronto Ontario, Son of Major Chas William Drew age 61 and Kate Isabella Drew age 57. Clifford came from a very large family and had many siblings. He had five brothers, George H. Drew age 31, Victor H. Drew age 25, Fredrick G. Drew age 22, Sgt. William Drew age 23 and Pte. Jack Drew age 27. He also had three sisters, Florence I. Drew age 19, Constance Drew age 19 and Mrs. Kay Mary Richardson age 33. Clifford Drew got married in Toronto Ontario on December 14th 1935 at the age of 20 to the lovely Mrs. Verna Evelyn Drew. After a year of their marriage they had their first child. James Robert Drew was born on March 20th, 1936 in Toronto Ontario. Four Years later they then had a baby girl, taking her mother’s middle name, Evelyn Mae Drew. She was born on November 21st 1940. Clifford worked hard as a plumber to support him, his wife & two beautiful babies. He came from a very Christian (Anglican) home. He attended the “Church of England”.  On June 20th 1940, only 25 Clifford Drew was enrolled in the “Queens Owns Rifles” of Canada. He served for four years in the war. Clifford was promoted to the rank of Corporal. On August 19th 1943. Cpl. Drew would have been a very wise choice for the military. He had very good health, he was large and built. His health history was highly looked upon. Clifford was killed in action at the age of 29 leaving his wife Verna Drew and his two children James and Evelyn Drew behind. Clifford was given the France-Germany Star, Defense Medal, Canadian Volunteer Service Medal (CVSM & Clasp) on 3/11/49 after he died on June 6th 1944.

Clifford Drew came from a very large family. There were six boys and three girls. George H. Drew was 31, Victor H. Drew who was 25, Fredrick G. Drew age 22, Pte. Jack Drew age 23 and Sgt. William Drew age 27, Pte. Drew and Sgt. Drew both served in the Canadian Army. His three sisters Florence Drew who was 19, Constance Drew age 17 and Mrs. Kay Mary Richardson at the age of 33. His family was all very close in age. Fredrick, Florence and Mrs. Richardson all live in the residence of Major Drew and Mrs. Drew in Toronto Ontario, 153 Garden Ave. Clifford’s mother Kate Isabella Drew sadly past on May 14th 1943. Leaving her husband and 8 children.

Clifford Robert Drew enlisted with the Queen’s Own Rifles on 20 June 1940 in Toronto, Ontario.  When he enlisted he was given the rank of Rifleman.  On 10 August 1940 until 26 November 1940 Drew is transferred to “W” Force in Newfoundland.  W Force was the infantry protection unit designed to defend Newfoundland from attack by German U-Boats.  He leaves Newfoundland on 8 December 1940 heading to Sussex, New Brunswick to continue his training with the Queen’s Own Rifles.  When he arrives he is given leave until the 12 December 1940.

He was struck off strength in preparation of leaving Canada joining the Canadian Army (Overseas) on 19 July 1941.  After a ten day voyage across the Atlantic he arrives in Gourock, Scotland on 29 July 1941.  Gourock, Scotland was a strategic port where many of the Canadian soldiers first landed in the United Kingdom. Clifford was admitted to the #1 General Hospital on 13 December 1941 of the Queen’s Owns Rifle’s. Clifford remained in the hospital until 6 January 1942. He was not paid while spending this time in the hospital due to something he had done possibly, the Military felt as though they had the right to say they did not have to give him pay. There for Clifford went almost a month without pay. Clifford on April 8 July 1942 was awarded the “Good Conduct Badge” and is appointed acting Lance Corporal on 19 November 1942. On December 1942 he was sent to Canadian Military headquarters for anti-gas training. When he successfully completes his course he receives an increase of pay of 10 cents per day to a maximum of $1.60. On 19 August 1943 he is promoted to the rank of Corporal and receives the Canadian Volunteer service medal and clasp.

He boards the troop ships for the Normandy invasion on 2 June 1944. He is killed in action on 6 June 1944.

On June 2nd 1944 C-Coy and other ATT personal’s with approximately 400 men along with them was Clifford Robert Drew was embarked off of the shore in Chilworth England from 6:30-9:00pm. After then they took sail on their long journey towards Juno Beach. It took C-Coy four whole days and finally on the fourth day they were on the shore line of Bernieres Sur Mer.  At 8:15am A and B-Coy had already taken a beating, specifically “A” company was hit really hard by heavy gun fire and machine fire. The CO two LT. and CSM have been wounded and they had two Sergeants’ Killed. 15minutes later at 8:30am C and D-Coy had touched down on the beach although half of their LCA’s casualties were blown up by underwater mines they continued to proceed to their objective. Some personal make it and pass through the assault coys to their positions.

After Clifford Drew was killed in action on 6 June 1944 his wife Mrs. Verna R. Drew was informed of his death on 28 August 1944. She then inherited most but not all of his belongings after his death such as his Memorial Cross Medal although his mother Mrs. Kathleen Drew received the Silver Cross Medal. He will forever be remembered by his loved ones back home for his greatand responsible duties he took charge of and his courage and perseverance displayed throughout his time he spent in the war. Not knowing how far he may have to go or what challenges that he may endure. Corporal Drew willingly put his life at risk to help insure the world to be a free place.

Clifford Robert Drew was buried at Beny-Sur-Mer Canadian Military Cemetery, Beny-Sur-Mer, France. Grave 1, row D, Plot 6.

 

Written by: a student at Smiths Falls District Collegiate Institute in Smiths Falls,  Ontario, Canada.

 Rédigé par: un élève de Smiths Falls District Collegiate Institution, Smiths Falls, Canada.

REMEMBER TODAY, REMEMBER ALWAYS.

THIS TRIBUTE PROFILE CONTAINS AVAILABLE BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON ONE OF THE CANADIANS WHO DIED ON JUNO BEACH ON 6 JUNE 1944. THE PROFILE ALSO RECOGNIZES THE INDIVIDUAL OR ORGANIZATION WHO GENEROUSLY SPONSORED THIS SOLDIER, AND INCLUDES A MESSAGE OF THANKS AND REMEMBRANCE FOR THEIR SACRIFICE. THIS INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE IN THE SOLDIER’S NATIVE TONGUE AND HAS BEEN COMPILED BY THE LEST WE FORGET PROGRAM AND, IN SOME CASES, THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF INDIVIDUALS CONNECTED WITH THE SOLDIERS. DUE TO THE INCONSISTENCY OF HISTORICAL RECORDS AND THE SPARSE AVAILABILITY OF FIRST-HAND WITNESSES, WE KNOW MORE ABOUT SOME THAN OTHERS. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO CONTRIBUTE ANY MATERIAL OR HELP IN OUR EFFORTS TO PRESENT THE BIOGRAPHIES IN BOTH FRENCH AND ENGLISH, PLEASE CONTACT: JBCA@JUNOBEACH.ORG.

CE PORTRAIT CONTIENT DES INFORMATIONS BIOGRAPHIQUES RELATIVES À L’UN DES CANADIENS QUI SONT MORTS SUR LA PLAGE JUNO, LE 6 JUIN 1944. IL PORTE ÉGALEMENT MENTION DE LA PERSONNE OU DE L’ORGANISATION QUI A GÉNÉREUSEMENT PARRAINÉ CE SOLDAT, AINSI QU’UN MESSAGE DE REMERCIEMENT EN SOUVENIR DE SON SACRIFICE. CES INFORMATIONS SONT DISPONIBLES DANS LA LANGUE MATERNELLE DU SOLDAT ET ONT ÉTÉ COMPILÉES PAR LE PROGRAMME LEST WE FORGET ET, DANS CERTAINS CAS, GRÂCE À LA GÉNÉROSITÉ DES PERSONNES LIÉES AUX SOLDATS. EN RAISON DE LA DISPARITÉ DES DOCUMENTS HISTORIQUES ET DES RARES TÉMOINS DE L’ÉPOQUE, NOUS NE DISPOSONS PAS DE LA MÊME QUANTITÉ D’INFORMATION SUR TOUS LES SOLDATS. SI VOUS SOUHAITEZ COMPLÉTER NOTRE DOCUMENTATION OU NOUS AIDER DANS NOS EFFORTS POUR PRÉSENTER LES BIOGRAPHIES EN FRANÇAIS ET EN ANGLAIS, MERCI DE CONTACTER : JBCA@JUNOBEACH.ORG.