Clifford Irwin Jackson

Lance Corporal Clifford Irwin Jackson, B63606
Toronto, Ontario
The Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada 

Lance Corporal Jackson is sponsored by the City of Toronto

 

Clifford Irwin Jackson was born 14 February 1921. Son of Claude William Jackson and Eva Jackson, Clifford had a brother Edgar (who also fought in World War Two.) and a sister Norine Blythe. At the age of 16 Clifford left school, to work as a confectionary. Clifford was born and raised in Toronto Ont. Clifford was 5 feet 9 inches, had brown eyes and black hair. Clifford’s relationship status was single. Clifford’s father Claude fought in the Great War and immigrated to Canada from England in 1886.  Clifford died at the age of 23, killed in action 6th June 1944 D-Day.

Clifford didn’t have any problems with his health nor did he have any medical issues while in the military. Clifford only had one visit to the hospital and it was not serious, it was the 27 April 43, while training he tripped in a hole and hurt his right shoulder. “While training on the morning of 27 April 43 I tripped in a hole and landed on my right shoulder.”

Clifford enlisted in 11 June 1940, at the age of 19. Clifford’s regiment was the Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada “B” Company. Clifford was promoted to CPL (Corporal) 21 May 1943. Before that Clifford had to go through training.  Clifford enlisted in Toronto and was given an allowance as he began his training that culminates in his successful completion of basic training after several weeks.  On 21 December 1940 he was transferred to Sussex, New Brunswick where he was given 20 days leave over the Christmas season.  When his training at Sussex was completed he was moved to Halifax, Nova Scotia in preparation to leave Canada for the United Kingdom.  He leaves Canada on 19 July 1941. He arrived at Gourock, Scotland which was a major destination for Canadian soldiers when they first landed in England.  Shortly after arriving in the United Kingdom he was given landing leave for four days to adjust to his new surroundings.

While he was training in England with the Queen’s Own Rifles he was awarded a good conduct badge for being a good soldier recognized by his superior officers. Given several leaves between June 1942 and December 1942 he enjoys several weeks away from barracks as part of his military experience in England.

On 20 February 1943 he was promoted to the rank of Acting Lance Corporal and is granted an increase of .10 cents per day to a total of $1.50.  Three months later on 31 May 1943 he is promoted yet again to Lance Corporal.    On 1 June 1944 Clifford Jackson boards the transport troop ship at Southampton harbor in preparation for the Normandy Landings.  He would be completing physical training and other exercises, in the early hours of 6 June 1944 when they would leave the transport ships

On board the ship waiting for the Normandy invasion to begin never to return to Canada, Clifford Jackson would not survive the day.

Finally the word comes and Clifford and “B” ( Coy) load into their landing craft assault boats making their way to the beach. The water is rough and some of the men start to get sick from the roughness.  I also wonder if they were sick because of nerves.  I think they would be shaking and probably thinking about their families. After a little while they are about 7 miles from the coast of France. As they got near the Normandy beaches gun fire can be heard but nothing to tremendous. According to the war diary “7:15am weapons cut loose with all they have.”  At 8:15 “A” coy and “B” Coy touchdown side by side but “immediately catch a packet of trouble.” They landed in a heavily defended position but “A” Coy at least gets off the beach but for “B” Coy they had a little bit more trouble. Men being wounded and the list of casualties rapidly increasing by the minute, but the men carry on with their jobs and try to forget about their friends that have been killed during the invasion of the Normandy beaches. The men start clearing up the beach, many being wounded and the high count of casualties, “C” and “D” Coys and alternate “B” Coy touchdown and start to make their way to the headquarters. Through the night there was a little bit of fighting and confusion on Wednesday,7 June, 1944 all types of big ships sit in the harbor, tanks and air crafts fly and run along, Canadian Soldiers marching through the French village of Berniers- Sur- Mer  “About 2300 hours Germans start to bomb. Two or three landed at one side of the camp- killed seventeen of our men.” The men got very little sleep that night from planes flying over and the light noise of gun shots in the distance.

Clifford Irwin Jackson was a hero like many others that gave their lives in order to protect our country and help others. Clifford an adventurous man, who wanted nothing more than to protect the people he loved like his family; Clifford will always be remembered for his brave service in the Canadian Army, he is truly a hero. Clifford died at the age of 23. He was buried at Beny-Sur-Mer Canadian Military Cemetery. Beny-Sur-Mer, France. Grave 11, Row A, Plot 1.

Clifford’s next of kin was his father Claude William Jackson who sadly passed away in the 70’s, he got all Clifford’s belongings like when he was awarded the Canadian volunteer service medal and clasp.

From family to friends the people who cared about Clifford should be proud and honored to have known and fought with him, Clifford joined the Army for the adventure and to fight for his country and he got the adventure he was looking for.

  Written by:  a student at the Smiths Falls District Collegiate Institute in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada.
Rédigé par:
  un élève de Smiths Falls District Collegiate Institute, Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada.

REMEMBER TODAY, REMEMBER ALWAYS.

THIS TRIBUTE PROFILE CONTAINS AVAILABLE BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON ONE OF THE CANADIANS WHO DIED ON JUNO BEACH ON 6 JUNE 1944. THE PROFILE ALSO RECOGNIZES THE INDIVIDUAL OR ORGANIZATION WHO GENEROUSLY SPONSORED THIS SOLDIER, AND INCLUDES A MESSAGE OF THANKS AND REMEMBRANCE FOR THEIR SACRIFICE. THIS INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE IN THE SOLDIER’S NATIVE TONGUE AND HAS BEEN COMPILED BY THE LEST WE FORGET PROGRAM AND, IN SOME CASES, THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF INDIVIDUALS CONNECTED WITH THE SOLDIERS. DUE TO THE INCONSISTENCY OF HISTORICAL RECORDS AND THE SPARSE AVAILABILITY OF FIRST-HAND WITNESSES, WE KNOW MORE ABOUT SOME THAN OTHERS. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO CONTRIBUTE ANY MATERIAL OR HELP IN OUR EFFORTS TO PRESENT THE BIOGRAPHIES IN BOTH FRENCH AND ENGLISH, PLEASE CONTACT: JBCA@JUNOBEACH.ORG.

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