Charles George Newman

Rifleman Charles George Newman,  B110149
Toronto, Ontario 
The Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada 

Rifleman Newman is sponsored by the City of Toronto

Charles George Newman was born on 25 March 1919 in Toronto, Ontario. He was the second oldest of four children born to William and Mary Newman. Charles had an older brother, Gordon William Newman, and two younger sisters, Irene Margret and Dorothy Mary Newman. Charlesand his family were religiously involved as Roman Catholics. He completed public school and continued on for two years of high school at Central Commerce Toronto. Charles was 23 when he enlisted in Toronto, Ontario. As a young unmarried man, Charles worked as a clerk before he enlisted. He planned to return to his job after the war.

 On 11 November 1940, Charles attended the Royal Regiment Long Branch Training Centre; he was a Private when he was attending a thirty day training camp. Following Training Camp, Charles enlisted in the general services in Toronto, Ontario on 11 March 1942. On 10 April 1942, he was transferred to Borden, Ontario, one hundred kilometers north of Toronto, Ontario.

While Charles was in Borden, Ontario, he was promoted to Acting-Lance Corporal with pay. Four months later, he was granted furlough for two weeks from 18 September 1942 till 1 October 1942, with $0.50 pay per day.

On 28 October 1942, Charles was promoted to the rank of Acting Corporal with pay.  He then was transferred to Simcoe, Ontario. Charles was transferred from Simcoe back to Borden; he was granted a six month increase in pay and was qualified to wear a Military Auxiliary Radio System (M.A.R.S) Badge. On 19 March 1943, Charles was promoted to the rank of Acting-Lance Corporal and transferred from Royal Engineers to Home War Establishment (H.W.E). Charles was at the Home War Establishment for three months. He was not taking any courses while he stayed and there was no clear reason why he was there. On 22 July 1943, Charles was granted furlough till 4 August 1943 (two weeks) with $0.50 pay per day.

On 19 August 1943, Charles was confirmed the role as Corporal and he was then transferred from Home War Establishment to Royal Engineers. Afterwards, he was struck on strength (SOS) and then transferred to Transit Camp in Windsor, Nova Scotia, bringing him closer to overseas deployment.

Charles was then taken on strength (TOS) with the Canadian Army and was sent overseas to the United Kingdom on 26 August 1943. He disembarked in the United Kingdom on 1 September 1943. The next day he had reported for duty; this was the day he was awarded the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal and clasp.

 On 1 September 1943, Newman and other soldiers of the Queens Own Rifles (QOR) disembarked in the United Kingdom. Nine months later, on 6 June 1944, Toronto’s Queen’s Own Rifles (QOR) landed at ‘Nan White’ beach near Bernières-sur-Mer at 0805.  A and B Company of the Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada had landed slightly off from their landing objective which would prove devastating to the two companies as they found themselves under extremely heavy enemy machine and mortar fire directed on the beach.    According to the war diary of the Queen’s Own Rifles, at 0805 hours, “The assault coy got the word to go in.  As yet no DD tanks or AVRE (Armoured Vehicles Royal Engineers) can be seen which looks rather ominous.”   Due to the weather conditions, the seas were rough and the Duplex Drive (DD) tanks that were supposed to land before the infantry didn’t touch down on the beach until after the infantry had landed.  This delay of armour on the beach proved costly for the infantry of the Queen’s Own Rifles. Several German machine guns (MG42) as well as mortars met the infantry as they began to move up the beach to engage the German defences.  The landing craft carrying the Queens Own Rifles hit the beaches intact; but when the landing bridge had dropped the two companies were under heavy open fire.

The two assault companies – A and B – made it to the beach; C and D company landed just after them at 0845. As noted in the war diary, “B coy immediately [caught] a packet of trouble as they are landed in front of a very heavily defended [position].  Several of the LCA’s [Landing Craft Assault] of both coys are blown up by mines but only the front two or three men are injured on this.”

Because they landed directly in front of an untouched enemy strongpoint and very quickly lost half of their strength, both companies struggled to move up the beach due to a shortage of men.  However, they worked quickly with hand grenades and rifles to take out the enemy nests, and then continued on, getting off the beach and moving in land. On this day, the Queen’s Own Rifles received the worst battering of any Canadian unit on D-Day.  The Queen’s Own Rifles had the highest number of casualties amongst the Canadian regiments that landed, with 143 men wounded, killed, or captured.

Charles George Newman was buried in Beny-Sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery, France in Grave 8, row A, plot 1. This cemetery contains 2,048 headstones from the Second World War. In Charles’s written will, he had left everything to his mother. Mrs. Evelyn Newman received Charles’s medals such as the 1939-45 Star, France-Germany Star, Defence Medal, War Medal, and the CVSM with clasp.  He was 25 years of age when he died.

 

Written by: Taylor Benda, a student at the Smiths Falls District Collegiate Institute in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada.

Rédigé par : Taylor Benda, un élève de Smiths Falls District Collegiate Institute in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada.

REMEMBER TODAY, REMEMBER ALWAYS.

THIS TRIBUTE PROFILE CONTAINS AVAILABLE BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON ONE OF THE CANADIANS WHO DIED ON JUNO BEACH ON 6 JUNE 1944. THE PROFILE ALSO RECOGNIZES THE INDIVIDUAL OR ORGANIZATION WHO GENEROUSLY SPONSORED THIS SOLDIER, AND INCLUDES A MESSAGE OF THANKS AND REMEMBRANCE FOR THEIR SACRIFICE. THIS INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE IN THE SOLDIER’S NATIVE TONGUE AND HAS BEEN COMPILED BY THE LEST WE FORGET PROGRAM AND, IN SOME CASES, THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF INDIVIDUALS CONNECTED WITH THE SOLDIERS. DUE TO THE INCONSISTENCY OF HISTORICAL RECORDS AND THE SPARSE AVAILABILITY OF FIRST-HAND WITNESSES, WE KNOW MORE ABOUT SOME THAN OTHERS. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO CONTRIBUTE ANY MATERIAL OR HELP IN OUR EFFORTS TO PRESENT THE BIOGRAPHIES IN BOTH FRENCH AND ENGLISH, PLEASE CONTACT: JBCA@JUNOBEACH.ORG.

CE PORTRAIT CONTIENT DES INFORMATIONS BIOGRAPHIQUES RELATIVES À L’UN DES CANADIENS QUI SONT MORTS SUR LA PLAGE JUNO, LE 6 JUIN 1944. IL PORTE ÉGALEMENT MENTION DE LA PERSONNE OU DE L’ORGANISATION QUI A GÉNÉREUSEMENT PARRAINÉ CE SOLDAT, AINSI QU’UN MESSAGE DE REMERCIEMENT EN SOUVENIR DE SON SACRIFICE. CES INFORMATIONS SONT DISPONIBLES DANS LA LANGUE MATERNELLE DU SOLDAT ET ONT ÉTÉ COMPILÉES PAR LE PROGRAMME LEST WE FORGET ET, DANS CERTAINS CAS, GRÂCE À LA GÉNÉROSITÉ DES PERSONNES LIÉES AUX SOLDATS. EN RAISON DE LA DISPARITÉ DES DOCUMENTS HISTORIQUES ET DES RARES TÉMOINS DE L’ÉPOQUE, NOUS NE DISPOSONS PAS DE LA MÊME QUANTITÉ D’INFORMATION SUR TOUS LES SOLDATS. SI VOUS SOUHAITEZ COMPLÉTER NOTRE DOCUMENTATION OU NOUS AIDER DANS NOS EFFORTS POUR PRÉSENTER LES BIOGRAPHIES EN FRANÇAIS ET EN ANGLAIS, MERCI DE CONTACTER : JBCA@JUNOBEACH.ORG.