Canada in the Second World War

Arms & Weapons

439 Squadron Operations Record Book, 9th August 1944

OPERATIONS RECORD BOOK
DETAIL OF WORK CARRIED OUT
BY No. 439 R.C.A.F. Squadron
FOR THE MONTH OF August 1944
Date Aircraft Type and Number Crew Duty Time
Up Down
9-8-44







Typhoon MN379
“       MN870
“        JR500
“       MN352
“       MP136
“       MN310
“       MN401
“       MN869
“       MN989
F/L Scharff
F/O Laurence
F/O Johns
F/O Monson
F/O Stitt
F/O Smith R.
F/O Porritt
F/O Brown, J.
F/O Laycock
Dive-Bombing







12:15







13:10







Details of Sortie or Flight

Once again the three squadrons of the Wing were sent out against the same target with W/C Judd leading. The target was the large area between road and river just Northeast of Clair Tizon (U.066/547) Apparently the attack was used simply as a softening-up punch in preparation for a ground attack. Shortly after take-off, F/O Monson was forced to return to base, after jettisoning his bombs in the Channel, because of a broken hydraulic line. He landed without use of flap. The remaining aircraft of the squadron dropped their 500 lb. bombs in the target area in a dive from 9000 feet to 4000 feet from East to West. A small amount of light flak was fired but none of our aircraft were damaged. The flight to and from the target was made in the formations of sections of three line abreast. This formation is used to save space on Wing Shows and finds little favour with the average pilot who claims it is much too unwieldy and does not provide protection against air attack. All aircraft returned safely to base.


9-8-44







Typhoon MP136
“       MN870
“       MN379
“       MN569
“       MN581
“       MN665
“       MN869
“       MN310
“       MN765
F/L Fiset
F/O Bernhart
F/O Brown, R.
F/O Smith
F/O Burton
F/O Stelter
F/O Hogg
F/O Moen
F/O Swingler
Dive-Bombing







16:25







17:20







Details of Sortie or Flight

F/L Fiset was in command of the Squadron as it carried 500 lb. bombs with nose instantaneous and .025 tail fusing, into the air against an enemy Infantry and M.T. [Motor Transport] position at 877383, four miles north of Conde-Sur-Noireau. Due to close proximity of the target to our own bomb line, the target was to be marked by red smoke. No smoke appeared and the squadron went on to attack the alternative target in the Bois de St. Clair, at (T.995400). The attack was made from 10000 feet down to 3,000 feet and all bombs struck the southern part of the wood on the east side of the road at that point. A large red flash, possibly from exploding petrol wad seen as a result of the bombing at 994406. Over the target area the enemy wasted a goodly amount of light and heavy flak. On the return trip a small amount of heavy flak, much too close for comfort, was fired at us from the vicinity of Conde-Sur-Noireau. Mission successful, all aircraft returned safely to base.


9-8-44







Typhoon JR506
“       MN870
“        JR500
“       MN796
“       MN352
“       MN989
“       MN401
“       MN310
“       MN869
F/L Scharff
F/O Bernhart
F/O Johns
F/O Grayon
F/O Monson
F/O Henderson
F/O Porritt
F/O Rassenti
F/O Smith, R.
Dive-Bombing







19:15







20:10







Details of Sortie or Flight

This job turned out to be the Christmas package of the day. The enemy were reported to have dug in at Jean Blanc, and created what promised to be a very troublesome foremost defended locality. Our squadron, led by F/L Scharff, took-off at 19:15 hours carrying 500 lb. bmbs to blast this foremost defended locality into submission. The heavy haze had dissipated somewhat by this time and the target was quite easily approached from the northwest at 6,000 right down to 1000 feet. All bombs landed where they were aimed for and the entire west half of the village seemed to rise into the air. F/L Scharff led the boys back in a beautiful straffing attack from the southwest at 1,000 feet right down to the tree tops. All fields, bushes, and roads leading into the village of Jean Blanc from this direction were viciously sprayed by cannon fire. At this point out own artillery dropped more red smoke-shells on the northwest corner of the target so we roared in again with cannon talking! This time the attack was pressed home until some of the aircraft were in danger of being hit by ricochets as they zoomed over the town. A small orchard at the northwest corner of the town was sprayed unmercifully in this attack and the Jerries glimpsed in there, had to be a long, long way down into their slit trenches to escape it. A large wooden house at the edge of the orchard was burning furiously and the entire village was choked in a mantle of smoke and dust. On the last attack the pilots turned away in a steep turn between the central church and the adjacent buildings. In this case to say that the mission was successful is a gross understatement even if written with a capital “S”. All aircraft and 11 jubilant pilots returned safely to base, feeling that close support was rendered to our armies.